Jojo Mayer: Spontaneous Creation

Опубликовано09.11.2018 в 01:13АвторSamusar






Jojo Mayer & Nerve: Splendid Isolation

One prefers stylish, bespoke suits and rock-star leather pants; the other is more of a blue jeans kind of guy. Along with keyboardist Jacob Bergson and sound engineer Aaron Nevezie, Mayer and Davis perform mystifying and thrilling feats of derring-do, re-creating the sounds and textures of electronica on live instruments.

Hooking up with Jojo was a chance to turn things upside down to see if there was another way to blend it all together. We shared a common language, and that enabled us to devise this kind of agenda to push music forward. But I knew we had a common language between us. You both said that you felt as though you shared a common language when you started playing together. What does that mean, exactly?

The language aspect really came down to our approach. It was a feeling. Everything comes down to feel somehow. It was his point of view, and that allowed us to attain synergy. An important part of synergy is point of view. If you have point of view that aligns, you can create synergy.

Is some of that negotiation non-verbal? Can it come out during improvisation? Ultimately, everything that happens when we play is informed by our point of view and our intentions. We improvise a lot. We jam a lot. Certain patterns start to emerge. At some point, there are verbal deliberations.

I think one of the best things that we started to do a couple years ago was record everything we played. Every sound check is recorded. But you do hear patterns and ideas that work, so good stuff comes out of the process. Before Nerve, you both had played with many brilliant musicians. I come back to point of view. What is your priority? What do you want to do? You need to take risks in music. You need to be fearless. How do you two define yourselves? Their contribution was more about creating a style than just two people who can play on a pop record and sound good.

But we have a unique vocabulary and a unique way of playing that not everybody has. I agree with that. The same goes for me. How does the element of familiarity come into play with the way you two work together? Do you always know what the other guy is going to do? No, not always, but you know what the intention is. A lot of it comes down to trust. You trust that the other person wants to make the music as good as possible and to elevate it. We know that we have different devices for creating drama and musical shapes.

In a live setting, are there times when you tune the other guy out? I think you always have to be paying attention. I think all the greatest musicians listen super intently and are aware of everything going on around them. We have our ups and downs. And when there is conflict, maybe that means the idea is interesting. Sometimes the corniest stuff is the hippest stuff if you look at it the right way.

Are there signals you both have picked up on? We have our own vocabulary of musical cues and idiosyncrasies. I think every really good musical entity spends a lot of time doing what they do. The Basie bands played shows a year. The Beatles played for three years, eight- to hour sets, seven times a week. I think this is one of the dilemmas that we have in our time: That thing is no longer happening, which is a very, very big loss. Before this interview, you had mentioned how musicians these days learn from YouTube.

It turns into something other than music. Music is a language. A language is a device for communication. I think that whole YouTube thing will die out.

People will lose interest in it.

Screaming Headless Torsos, Intergalactic Maiden Ballet, John Medeski, Meshell Ndegeocello, Dizzy Gillespie, Nina Simone. Website, web-climat.ruyer. com. Sergé

We need culture and art. I believe art has a function in society. How does something like tone affect how you work together? I think sound is everything. Sound and time are far more important than actual notes. Anyone can play the same notes Miles played. Anyone can play a beat that Bonham played. Do you two have agreed-upon formalities in how you establish grooves? There are no formalities. The older I get, the less I believe that you create a groove.

I think you enter a groove. It was there before you started playing. We want to take things forward, and you can only do that by allowing yourself to enter a new atmosphere. We agree on the qualities of some of the people that created music before us: Ringo is an outstanding musician.

Everybody in the band was fortunate to have Ringo playing with them, not just because of his feel but also because of his understanding of composition and architecture. Wow, those are little works of art! So you put him with Paul McCartney, and you have two guys who really share a point of view about composition and static structure. They knew how to put things together that interlock.

I think that pretty much nails it. They were concerned with sound and the presentation of the instruments.

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The Beatles were the first band to insist that their engineers put microphones on the bass drum and the snare. We owe them so much in how they advanced the sound of modern recording. It sounds totally contemporary. They wanted to break new ground.

We want to break new ground. That one anecdote sort of sums up why he was, like, the perfect drummer. His sound was perfect, the parts he played were perfect, and the way he delivered the song was perfect. He makes everything else that happens on top of the sound perfect.

Once again, music is a language that communicates a point of view, an emotion, a stance. Very often less is more, but sometimes less is less and sometimes more is more. Jojo, what makes John the perfect bass player to work with?

His curiosity, his talent, his work ethic, and his general point of view about this world. What makes Jojo the perfect drummer for you to work with?

All of which makes it makes it more than a little surprising when Mayer points out that he never took a drum lesson in his life. I got really good at imitating their playing — it became very natural.


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Jojo Mayer & Nerve - Live in Europe (Hinterhof, Basel)


Jojo Mayer & John Davis of Nerve. March 13, FROM...

{REPLACEMENT-(Зайцев.нет)-(web-climat.ru)}One prefers stylish, bespoke suits and rock-star leather pants; the other is more of a blue jeans kind of guy. Along with keyboardist Jacob Bergson and sound engineer Aaron Nevezie, Mayer and Davis perform mystifying and thrilling feats of derring-do, re-creating the sounds and textures of electronica on live instruments. Hooking up with Jojo was a chance to turn things upside down to see if there was another way to blend it all together.

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Comments: 3

  1. 19.11.2018
    Arashikazahn

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